Block Plane
A few years ago I made myself an infill block plane fabricated in brass and steel. The tool shown here is a second, slightly improved, design made this year. The design is broadly based on a style that I had seen used by numerous other makers, but I left out some features typically found on this style of plane and added others. The resulting tool has been my go to plane for fine work ever since.
The plane is designed for a bevel up blade set at an intermediate 18 degrees. I have found that this allows me greatest flexibility when adjusting the cutting angle to suit the job. I do not make the blades, the plane is made to fit a commercially available blade of A1 steel. The mouth is very narrow - this is a finishing tool and not intended for heavy cuts. The blade is retained by a leaver cap and screw that pivots on a cross bar. The screw lands on a brass insert in the wedge.
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The sole is 6mm tool steel in two pieces joined at the mouth and aligned with pins within the joint providing a positive connection between the two pieces. Sides are of CZ108 brass joined to the sole by peened dovetails. In-fills in this plane were of Pau Rosa and are retained with through rivets with sleeves that prevent any wood shrinkage compromising the squareness of the sides to the sole.
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There is no adjuster. Adjustments to the cut are achieved with a light mallet applied either to the blade or the back of the plane. This system is simple and efficient once the knack has been learnt.
These planes take a long time to make and, arguably, are not functionally any better than the best commercially available block planes such as those by Lie-Nielsen et al. They are however a delight to use, inspiring to look at and reassuringly heavy!
If you want me to make you one, please get in touch to discuss the details.